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Glaucoma Clinic

WHAT IS GLAUCOMA?

Glaucoma is the term used to describe a group of eye diseases which damage the optic nerve, the nerve that connects the eye to the brain. If left untreated glaucoma can result in blindness.

In the more common forms of glaucoma there is increased pressure in the eye which presses on the optic nerve and causes a gradual loss of peripheral vision.

In the more common forms of glaucoma there is increased pressure in the eye which presses on the optic nerve and causes a gradual loss of peripheral vision.

We will weigh all of these factors before deciding if you need treatment for glaucoma; or whether you should be monitored regularly as a glaucoma suspect to detect the early signs of damage to the optic nerve.

What Are the Types of Glaucoma?

There are two main types of glaucoma:

Open-angle glaucoma. Also called wide-angle glaucoma, this is the most common type of glaucoma. The structures of the eye appear normal, but fluid in the eye does not flow properly through the drain of the eye, called the trabecular meshwork.

Angle-closure glaucoma. Also called acute or chronic angle-closure or narrow-angle glaucoma. Poor drainage is caused because the angle between the iris and the cornea is too narrow and is physically blocked by the iris. This condition leads to a sudden buildup of pressure in the eye.

What Are the Symptoms of Glaucoma?

Glaucoma most often occurs in adults over age 40, but it can also occur in young adults, children, and even infants.

For most people, there are usually few or no symptoms of glaucoma. The first sign of glaucoma is often the loss of peripheral or side vision, which can go unnoticed until late in the disease. This is why glaucoma is often called the "sneak thief of vision."

Detecting glaucoma early is one reason you should have a complete exam with an eye specialist every one to two years. Occasionally, intraocular pressure can rise to severe levels. In these cases, sudden eye pain, headache, blurred vision, or the appearance of halos around lights may occur.

If you have any of the following symptoms, seek immediate medical care:

How Is Glaucoma Treated?

As a rule, damage caused by glaucoma cannot be reversed. Eye drops, laser surgery, and surgery in the operating room are used to help prevent further damage. In some cases, oral medications also may be prescribed.

With any type of glaucoma, periodic examinations are very important to prevent vision loss. Because glaucoma can progress without your knowledge, adjustments to your treatment may be necessary from time to time.

Glaucoma OCT: The Glaucoma module of the OCT helps in the better understanding and management of the glaucoma. OCT is one of the advanced tools to early detect glaucoma as early as 20% damage.

Who is at Risk for Glaucoma?

High eye pressure alone does not mean that you have glaucoma, but it is an important risk factor your ophthalmologist will use to determine your risk for developing the disease.

The most important risk factors include:

We will weigh all of these factors before deciding if you need treatment for glaucoma; or whether you should be monitored regularly as a glaucoma suspect to detect the early signs of damage to the optic nerve.

Medicines:

Glaucoma is often treated with eye drops taken regularly several times a day, sometimes in combination with pills. These medications will alter the circulation of eye fluid and lower eye pressure, either by decreasing the production of fluid within the eye, or by increasing the flow leaving the drainage angle. It is important to tell all of your doctors about the eye medications you are using because glaucoma medications can have side-effects. You should notify immediately if you think you may be experiencing side-effects. Side-effects from some eye drops may include a stinging sensation, red eyes, blurred vision, headaches, or changes in pulse, heartbeat or breathing. Side-effects from pills may include tingling of fingers and toes, drowsiness, loss of appetite, bowel irregularities, kidney stones, anemia or bleeding disorders.

  • Treatment:
    The treatment for glaucoma depends upon the nature and severity of each case. In general, glaucoma cannot be cured, but it can be controlled. Eye drops, pills, laser procedures, and surgical operations are used to prevent or slow further damage from occurring. With any type of glaucoma, regular eye examinations are very important to detect progression and to prevent vision loss. Because glaucoma can worsen without your being aware of it, your treatment will likely need to be changed over time to achieve a lower "target eye pressure."
  • Laser Surgery:
    Laser surgery is also effective for glaucoma treatment. Trabeculoplasty is laser treatment to enhance the eye drain age function to control eye pressure within the eye when treating open-angle glaucoma. Iridotomy is laser treatment to create tiny holes in the iris to improve the flow of eye fluid to the drain when treating narrow angle glaucoma.
  • Operative Surgery:
    When operative surgery is needed to treat glaucoma, doctor will use a microscope and specialized instruments to create a new bypass drainage channel for the eye fluid to leave the eye. The new channel helps to lower the eye pressure. Surgery will be recommended only if it requires to the benefit of a lower eye pressure achieved with an operation outweighs possible complications and/or further progression of optic nerve damage.

hospital address

1st Floor, Rizvi Nagar, Near Sarang Restaurant, S.V.Road, Next to Milan Mall, Santacruz (W), Mumbai - 400 054

EMERGENCY ( 24X7 )

Mobile: 9820092600 / 7506499962

E-mail

keniaeye@gmail.com

info@keniaeyehospital.com